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Determining the Fate of PM 2.5 Particles Following Capture by Leaves (05-DG-11233225-228)

Grant Number
05-DG-11233225-228

Study of PM 2.5 deposition, re-suspension and wash off from leaves under controlled conditions, and dispersion of PM 2.5 near roads and the effect of vegetation on dispersion patterns.

This project studied particulate matter (PM) 2.5 deposition, re-suspension and wash off from leaves under controlled conditions, and dispersion of PM 2.5 near roads and the effect of vegetation on dispersion patterns. Our prior work indicates that net deposition occurs at low rates, with little effect on the concentration remaining in the air. This study found that for leaf types ranging from small needles (hemlock) to broadleaved species (Norway maple) and wind speeds up to 30 mph, re-suspension of PM 2.5 was nil. In contrast, simulated rainfall amounting to ca 0.2 " rinsed> 50% of the PM 2.5 from leaf surfaces and 0.4" reduced leaf loads to background detection limits. Dose-response studies showed that while different leaf types accumulated different amounts of PM 2.5, there was no indication of saturation even with exposure to extreme doses. Outdoor monitoring campaigns show that local PM2.5 sources such as vehicular traffic increase human exposure by orders of magnitude, yet these transient spikes go undetected by official monitors. These local plumes dissipate rapidly with distance regardless of tree cover, but a dense hedge appears to contribute to the magnitude of reduction.

Contact
Whitlow, T.
thw2@cornell.edu
607.255.1793
Organization
Cornell University Dept. of Horticulture
134A Plant Science Building
Ithaca, NY 14853
Total Project Cost
$ 84,460
=
Federal Share
$ 42,189
+
Grantee Share
$ 42,271
Year of Award
2005
Year of Expiration
2007
FS Manager
Matt Arnn
Grant Categories
Research & Technology Development
Sub-Topics
Air Quality/Pollution
State(s)/Region(s)
New York
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