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Tree-age may help with emerald ash borer

"Tree-age" is similar to the medical process of triage, which determines treatment to those who may survive with proper care. In this case, the patient is Fraxinus species, known as Ash.

A question has arisen since the recent announcement regarding a new treatment for the emerald ash borer: Is it the magic cure to help slow the invasion?

"Tree-age" is similar to the medical process of triage, which determines treatment to those who may survive with proper care. In this case, the patient is Fraxinus species, known as Ash.

During the months of June, July and August, adult emerald ash borers are actively seeking mates and laying eggs. The larvae emerge and quickly bore into a tree's bark to reach the cambium layer. By doing so, water and nutrient supplies are cut-off to this layer, known as the annual ring, and death is in one to four years.

For homeowners, tree-age is an attempt to save or prevent the loss of ash trees, especially if there is sentimental attachment. However, it is not a cost-effective method for heavy ash tree populations such as parks and forests. A licensed pesticide applicator must administer a chemical, emamectrin benzoate, through trunk injections.

The current status of EAB quarantine includes 35 counties of Ohio, and the movement of firewood is restricted by county quarantine and by state lines. For more information, visit the following Web sites: www.ashalert.osu.edu, ohioline.osu.edu, www.emeraldashborer.info, ohioagriculture.gov.eab and www.michigan.gov/eab.

You also may call these agencies: Ohio State University Extension — Montgomery County at (937) 224-9654, or e-mail questions to montmg@osu.edu; Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Forestry Division at (513) 932-6836 or the Ohio Department of Agriculture at (888) OHIO-EAB/(888) 644-6322.

To find a local, certified arborist, go to www.isa-arbor.com, click on "verify arborist," and enter your city and state. A list will be provided for your location, which provides arborists who have tested and passed required exams in pesticide applications and other skill areas. No recommendations are given to any one arborist or company, and it does not reflect business credibility.

You many begin to see purple-colored, milk carton-like traps in areas populated by ash trees. These traps are similar to sticky boards that transmits pheromones (a chemical naturally produced by this insect) to attract EAB. This carton is not designed to serve as a trap, but to monitor EAB activity in a given area.

Please remember that no matter what the attempts may be, no treatment is 100 percent effective. Tree-age is one step to getting us closer to a possible solution.

Contact this columnist at (937) 224-9654 or thorn.20@osu.edu

Date
Jun 12, 2008
Reporter
Clare Thorn
Dayton Daily News
©2008
Sub-Topics
Insects, Inventory (forest)
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National
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